Tag Archives: Argentina

The Syrian-Lebanese Diasporas in Latin America and the Syrian Conflict

VENEZUELA-SYRIA-CHAVEZ-ASSAD

Finally! Our Research on the Politicization of the Syrian-Lebanese Diasporas in Latin America is available in English.

In the following report, we examine the politicization paths of the Syrian-Lebanese Diasporas in the context of the Syrian conflict, shedding the light on these little-known communities in Venezuela, Brazil and Argentina.

We analyse, in particular, the different reasons why these communities overwhelmingly support the Syrian regime: anti-Imperialism, solidarity with the Eastern Christians and influence of an ancient Alawite community in Argentina.

This research was published in the French book “Pas de Printemps pour la Syrie”, La Découverte, December 2013.  We would like to express our appreciation to Pol O Beaglaoich for translating our work. Check our report on our website.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Did you know? Latin America has had 8 presidents of Arab origin

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

According to Al-Ahram, over 17 million people in Latin America are thought to be of Arab origin. Other estimations calculate that Latin Americans of Arab descent could represent up to 5% of the region, or 25-30 million people. Most of them are descendants of immigrants who came from Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan, during the first decades of the 20th century.

One thing is certain: Latin America hosts the largest Arab diaspora in the world. By comparison, the Arab minority in Europe (including Arab immigrants and Europeans of Arab origin) was estimated at about 6 million in 2010.

Latin Americans of Arab descent have been disproportionately successful. Nowhere in the world more than in Latin America have the Arab migrants been able to thrive and be so successful. The names of Carlos Slim in Mexico, Miguel Facussé in Honduras or José Said in Chile are synonyms of economic power and political influence. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The 2010 Nuclear Swap Deal (Brazil, Turkey & Iran) – 5 Lessons, 4 Recommendations

Swap Deal Triumph

NGC is happy to share with you the speech it delivered during the USEK International Symposium on the Relations between the Middle East and South America.

Enjoy the reading and share your thoughts with us!

NGC Team

Your Excellencies,

Distinguished Colleagues,

Dear Friends,

Allow me to start by welcoming all of those who came a long way to join us and by congratulating the organizers for this important event, the University of Saint Esprit of Kaslik (USEK) and the RIMAAL.

This is truly a fantastic opportunity to have an in-depth discussion on the potential of a new relation between the Middle East and South America. We are, I believe, the pioneers of an emerging strategic alliance that will bring about many benefits for the peoples of both regions and beyond.

Let me focus today on the potentialities of a Latin American political mediation in the post-Arab spring Middle East. It is mainly a prospective exercise that will:
– Draw five lessons from the nuclear swap deal between Iran, on the one hand, and Brazil and Turkey on the other hand,
– Formulate four recommendations for future initiatives.

I. Five Lessons Learned from the Nuclear Swap Deal

Let us start by analyzing a real historical precedent: the nuclear swap deal between Brazil, Turkey and Iran. In the spring of 2010, Brazil and Turkey carried out a diplomatic initiative to broker the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) fuel swap with Iran, taking in a former US proposal of October 2009. Under the deal, Iran was to ship 1,200kg of low-enriched uranium to Turkey, in return for fuel for its research reactor.

This initiative was hailed by some observers as a powerful indicator of the empowerment and “autonomization” of emerging diplomacies from traditional decision centers and western powers.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

NGC’s Publication in Les Carnets de l’Ifpo

NGC and the French Institute for the Near East (IFPO), a unique research center based in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Palestine, have started an informal collaboration to debate and share knowledge and analysis on the Middle East.

The IFPO is a French public research institution gathering researchers in three different departments: Contemporary Studies, Arab Medieval and Modern Studies, Archeology and History of Antiquity.

In this context, the IFPO published in its latest electronic issue NGC’s article on the Syrian crisis seen from South America (Venezuela, Brazil, and Argentina). Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

See you soon in Argentina, Brazil and Paris!

Journey

New Information Technologies and social media are wonderful communication tools but nothing replaces a real trip and face-to-face encounters and discussions in different languages and cultural contexts.

NGC is thus embarking on a long journey to Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Paris to meet with its strategic partners and members, craft new alliances, advance innovative initiatives and participate in two important international events.

We are looking forward to sit and talk with our partners from Emprendia in Buenos Aires, check the New Cities Foundation e-health project we coordinate in close cooperation with the Municipality of Rio and explore potential cooperation with Conectas in Sao Paulo, a Brazilian NGO playing a leading role in the field of Human Rights and the Rule of Law. We will then fly to Paris to brainstorm with the Arab Network for the Study of Democracy (ANSD) and Arabsthink on the situation in the Middle East.

We will be participating in the Living Labs Global Award 2012 in Rio the 2nd and 3rd of May and presenting the NFC e health Pilot Project, and then attend the amazing Summit the New Cities Foundation is organizing in Paris the 14-16 of May. Hope to see you there!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,